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The information I need to calculate a solar power system is: a) Your approximate location b) The rate you're paying for electricity in dollars per kWh. For example, in one location the first 350 kWh on your bill might be 10.5 cents per kWh, and kWh from 351 to 850 at billed at 12.5 cents. Your monthly electrical bill (for example, $236.15 divided by number of kWh consumed) in mid summer and in mid winter is useful. c) The amount you're willing to spend on a system. edit: the pvwatts results I'm cutting and pasting into these replies are for cumulative kWh generated in one month. an example: "Results" "Month", "Solar Radiation (kWh/m2/day)", "AC Energy (kWh)", "Energy Value the first number is the month (january), the second is sunlight solar radiation as per the NREL climate model for the area, the third number and the most important is the kWh generated per month (605). I have an interesting question for you that I think is worth kind of jacking the thread...I think. I live where what might be the best possible location for solar power, Antelope Valley, Ca. I see a major issue with many of the large installations out here with obscuration due to local weather phenomena. Being dry most of the time, it's relatively dusty. Couple that with spring time morning dew and some early morning wind, and you have thousands of very dirty panels that will be very obscured until they're all sprayed off, or the next good rain, which can be a very long time. Is this an issue for some of your remote sites, or are they already generating more than half of what's needed in a worst case scenario? The dirty panels question has been somewhat answered by statistics from large German PV installations. There was one (30kW+ size) which got covered in pollen this spring and saw about a 5% decrease in total power. I don't think that the dust/cleaning problem is enough of a hassle to not build a solar system, particularly when a small pressure washer used at a distance can very effectively clean panels quickly. Solar panels are designed to withstand some rather big hail storms, so unless you get too close with a pressure washer, it's hard to damage the glass top layer. My off grid sites are sized to generate 35% more than what they need for survival in January and December. Most of the sites are visited at least 3 to 4 times a year by people who are instructed to wipe off the solar panels with some rags that are left at the site. Another factor is that at some sites the solar panels are mounted vertically to optimize winter power production at a latitude of 50 degrees north, so they tend to collect much less dust than they would otherwise. They're also vertical for snow shedding reasons.

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Blogger 22 Mei 2017 12:42 PTG  

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